D.C. families earned nearly $84 million from Airbnb in 2017

As District of Columbia families continue reaping the economic benefits of home sharing, Airbnb is releasing new data on the additional income its host community earned during 2017 to help to pay their mortgage, rent and other monthly bills. Between January and December 2017, residents across all eight wards of the District made $83.8 million by sharing their homes with tourists, college interns, and business travelers.

A recent review of the platform also found that the District of Columbia welcomed over 5,600 Airbnb guest arrivals for New Year’s Eve 2017 — representing a 58 percent increase from New Year’s Eve 2016.

“Home sharing through Airbnb continues to be a unique and flexible way for District families to make more money, pay their bills, and support their communities,” said Will Burns, Public Policy Director for Airbnb in Washington, D.C. “We look forward to 2018 being another successful year of giving D.C. residents an economic boost, travelers more affordable accommodations, and neighborhood businesses more foot traffic.”

Further analysis of Airbnb stays in the nation’s capital during 2017 revealed:

  • Nearly 428,000 Airbnb guest arrivals occurred in the District of Columbia.
  • Approximately 6,400 District families hosted at least one Airbnb guest.
  • The typical host shared their home 49 nights and earned $5,800 in additional income.
  • Fifty-two (52%) of Airbnb hosts in D.C. are women.

The following data is an overview of 2017 guest arrivals, host income and the percentage of female hosts in each ward of the District:

2017 guest arrivals and total host income

District Ward 2017 Guest Arrivals 2017 Host Income % of Female Hosts
Ward 1 72,500 $14.4 Million 48
Ward 2 84,100 $22.9 Millon 49
Ward 3 15,200 $3.6 Million 57
Ward 4 26,800 $4.3 Million 57
Ward 5 70,700 $10.2 Million 53
Ward 6 134,500 $26 Million 55
Ward 7 13,800 $1.4 Million 60
Ward 8 10,000 $1 Million 54