Empowering local communities by supporting thousands of jobs

Of the estimated 730,000 jobs Airbnb supported around the world in 2016, about one in five were in the US. New York City alone accounts for 26,000 of the jobs supported last year, followed by Los Angeles at 14,800 and San Francisco at 5,300, according to a NERA Economic Consulting report commissioned by Airbnb.

NERA also estimates that in 2017, Airbnb may support even more jobs in the communities where we operate around the world: about 1.3 million, a 78-percent increase over 2016.

Airbnb Head of Global Policy and Public Affairs Chris Lehane released the figures in a presentation to the Consumer Technology Association in Washington, DC, where he emphasized how Airbnb’s platform not only empowers our host community to use their homes to make needed income, but also empowers local communities through hundreds, thousands or even tens of thousands of jobs supported by Airbnb host and guest spending and its ripple effects. Up to 50 percent of Airbnb guest spending occurs in the neighborhoods where they stay.

The top 10 US cities in numbers of Airbnb-supported jobs in 2016 are:

US City Airbnb-supported jobs
New York City 26,000
Los Angeles14,800
San Francisco5,300
New Orleans4,900
Chicago4,700
Miami4,700
San Diego4,300
Austin4,200
Seattle4,000
Portland3,800

While these 10 cities account for a majority of the 134,000 US jobs supported last year, 43 percent are located outside these 10 markets in mid-sized and smaller cities, such as those cities ranked #11 through #15:

US City Airbnb-supported jobs
DC3,700
Nashville3,500
Miami Beach3,100
Denver2,900
Kissimmee2,800

The NERA study was conducted in conjunction with the release of Airbnb’s Economic Empowerment Agenda. The Agenda includes: our Living Wage Pledge, by which we’ll indicate hosts who commit to paying their house cleaners at least $15 per hour; our own commitment to paying our major vendors $15 per hour for employees who work on our accounts in the US; and our commitment to double the size of our host community in urban majority-minority districts and disadvantaged neighborhoods in the US within two years.

Numbers of jobs supported were calculated by NERA using classical “input-output” economic analysis. This work modeled the number of jobs based on data about Airbnb income earned by hosts, host spending activity, and guest spending activity in local communities.