Smart home partnership helps North American hosts conserve, spend less on energy

Airbnb’s new partnership with Vivint Smart Home will help US and Canadian hosts conserve energy and lower their energy costs. Announced at CES 2017, the partnership allows Airbnb hosts to manage their homes while they are away through features including automatic keyless access, home security, and automatic thermostat management. For example, the Vivint Element thermostat works with smart devices throughout the home to accurately determine when guests check out, then automatically adjusts the temperature to conserve energy while guests are out exploring the neighborhood.

The Vivint partnership is just the latest example of how home sharing can make travel more sustainable. In fall 2016, Airbnb announced a partnership with SolarCity making it easier and cheaper for hosts and guests to power their homes with solar energy. As part of that announcement, we released estimates of the environmental benefits of home sharing for travelers based on methodology developed by Cleantech Group. Among the findings: Airbnb properties in the US consume less energy than hotels per guest night by 63 percent, and produce lower greenhouse gas emissions by 61 percent.

Also last fall, Airbnb partnered with the Sydney Opera House in New South Wales, Australia on a campaign to showcase the iconic building’s sustainable design through tours of parts of the building not previously opened to the public, and promotion of how the Opera House staff conserves energy during their daily routines.

Home sharing is a sustainable option for travelers and for hosts looking to make extra income by using resources that already exist.

Home sharing is a sustainable option for travelers and for hosts looking to make extra income by using resources that already exist. We’ve had 15 of the 16 hottest years on record since 1998, with 2015 being the hottest ever. Growing concern about climate change is causing people, especially Millennials, to think more about conserving energy and keeping a light footprint. In the US alone, about 13 million homes and more than twice that number of spare bedrooms go unused these days, according to the US Census Bureau.