The positive impact of Airbnb in Prague

Today we are releasing new data about the hosts on Airbnb who welcome guests from across the world into their Prague homes. The data helps confirm that hosts on Airbnb in Prague are typically regular people, occasionally sharing their home and city they love, while using the additional income to pay the bills and stay in their home.

It comes as CETA (Centrum ekonomických a tržních analýz) released a new study showcasing that hosts on Airbnb do not contribute to house price increases in Prague – mainly caused by an increase in demand and the lack of new homes. According to the study, ‘the impact of Airbnb’s arrival on the Czech market proved to be statistically very insignificant in the development of the supply price index in the capital city of Prague’ and ‘that home sharing provides the opportunity for families to make their living easier and offers additional accommodation capacity in the city, which is particularly lacking in touristy months’. You can view the CETA press release here and the research here.

Here is the data:

  • Last year, around 14,000 homes and rooms were shared on Airbnb in Prague – a typical host earns $4,100 by sharing their home or space in their home 62 days a year
  • Hosts have been living on average 13 years in Prague
  • Half of the hosts in Prague are freelancers and one in five hosts works in the creative industry
  • Almost half of the hosts in Prague use Airbnb to be able to stay in their home
  • Over 90 percent of hosts recommend local businesses such as cafes to their guests
  • Prague hosts are being rated 4.7 stars out of 5 on average by their guests

Vladimir Beroun, Public Policy Manager for Airbnb in the Czech Republic said:

“The figures released today show that home sharing on Airbnb is having a positive impact on the great city of Prague and can actually be a solution to the upcoming challenges the city is facing. We want to work together with local policy makers on smart home sharing policies – based on facts – which ensure that regular inhabitants can continue to make extra income; travellers can continue to belong anywhere; and cities can continue to enjoy the benefits of healthy and sustainable tourism.”