Wisconsin Airbnb hosts earned $25.2 million, welcomed 210,000 guests in 2017

Airbnb, the world’s leading community-driven hospitality company, announced today that its Wisconsin host community earned a combined $25.2 million in supplemental income while welcoming approximately 210,000 guest arrivals to the state in 2017.

The 210,000 guest arrivals to Wisconsin via Airbnb represents 97% year-over-year growth. This comes as Wisconsin residents increasingly embrace the home sharing platform as an opportunity to earn supplemental income and make ends meet. There are now over 4,000 Wisconsin hosts who share their homes for via Airbnb, typically earning about $6,300 annually in supplemental income.

Statewide data indicates that Airbnb and its host community appear to be complementing — rather than competing with — the Wisconsin hotel industry. Reports from Wisconsin Hotel & Lodging Association demonstrate that Wisconsin hotel occupancy rates, daily prices and revenue have grown steadily, in parallel to Airbnb’s growth. This suggests that Airbnb is opening up the state to a new slice of prospective tourists by catering to travelers less able to afford hotels, those who desire to stay in neighborhoods or cities that lack hotels, and families who prefer to be together under one roof.

In addition to the new income going into the pockets of Wisconsin Airbnb hosts, the state is generating new revenue through a tax agreement announced in June that allows Airbnb to collect and remit the Wisconsin state sales tax (as well as a number of local resort taxes) on behalf of its hosts. In 2017, Airbnb also secured tax agreements with both Madison and Green Bay to collect and remit their local hotel taxes on behalf of local hosts. Airbnb will continue to update the public and its hosts on the extent to which these collaborations deliver new revenue for the state and cities, and the company hopes to secure additional tax agreements with Wisconsin municipalities in 2018.

The home sharing community provides significant value through expanded lodging capacity for Nebraska communities when hotels sell out during big events, including Madison during huge events related to the university, Green Bay during Packer games, and Milwaukee during all the summer festivals. In 2017, Airbnb also released data indicating the potential of home sharing for more rural communities of Wisconsin that lack traditional hotel accommodations.

What follows is an overview of 2017 guest arrivals and total host income, broken down by the top 30 home sharing markets in Wisconsin.

City

Total 2017 Guest Arrivals

Total 2017 Host Income

Milwaukee

40,600

$4.2 million

Madison

27,330

$3.6 million

Wisconsin Dells

6,730

$718,000

Green Bay

6,520

$887,000

Lake Geneva

4,580

$652,000

Sturgeon Bay

4,420

$586,000

Egg Harbor

2,650

$415,000

Appleton

2,590

$282,000

La Crosse

2,460

$211,000

Eau Claire

2,340

$140,000

Oshkosh

2,240

$510,000

Baraboo

2,190

$235,000

Hayward

2,090

$287,000

Superior

1,980

$178,000

Williams Bay

1,960

$211,000

Bayfield

1,904

$206,000

Wauwatosa

1,710

$212,000

Ashland

1,460

$157,000

Kenosha

1,400

$187,000

Plymouth

1,230

$209,000

Elkhorn

1,160

$250,000

Eagle River

1,100

$150,000

Sheboygan

1,080

$177,000

Cable

1,030

$88,000

Poynette

1,030

$98,000

Rhinelander

930

$107,000

Fitchburg

920

$101,000

Wausau

900

$119,000

De Pere

860

$76,000

Shawano

860

$82,000